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Congressman Ken Buck

Representing the 4th District of Colorado

Ken Buck votes for affordable food prices

July 14, 2016
Press Release

For Immediate Release

Contact: Kyle Huwa, 202-225-4676

Washington, D.C. – Today, Congressman Ken Buck voted to keep food prices affordable by fighting government red tape. He opposed Senate Bill 764 because it mandates a GMO labeling regime that burdens farmers, small business owners, and consumers. Scientific studies have shown repeatedly that consuming modified foods pose no risk to human health.

“A GMO labeling mandate ties up food producers in red tape, driving up costs for Colorado families,” Congressman Ken Buck stated. “A flawed labeling law in one state should not lead us to create a shortsighted law for the other 49 states.”

S. 764 is an attempt to preempt the State of Vermont’s poorly written GMO labeling law. The state’s new legislation requires food producers across the country to meet onerous new requirements in order to sell food in Vermont. But S. 764 takes a flawed idea in one state and applies it to all 50 states. Creating a new labeling mandate based on the nonscientific demands of GMO labeling advocates sets an extremely dangerous precedent of federal intervention in the agriculture and food industries.

Congressman Buck believes food producers should be permitted to voluntarily include GMO labeling. That’s why he cosponsored and voted for H.R. 1599, the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act, a bipartisan bill that protects consumers from a patchwork of labeling laws and allows voluntary labeling.

Rep. Ken Buck (CO-04) is the Freshman Class President. He serves on the House Judiciary Committee and the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.  He serves on the OGR Subcommittees on Government Operations and the Interior and is a member of the Judiciary Subcommittees on Immigration and Border Security and Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security and Investigations.

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